Property Values study

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A property values study has been completed as part of Melbourne Airport's planning for its Runway Development Program.

The study looked at the impact of aircraft noise on property values in suburbs around Melbourne Airport and across the metropolitan area. It covered 320,000 residential property sales for 62 suburbs in 19 local government areas over a 25-year period from 1990 to 2015.

Many of the suburbs included in the study have been developed since Melbourne Airport opened in 1970. Some of the suburbs under flight paths have only been developed since 1998.

The study was undertaken by Property Economics Professor Chris Eves, formerly of the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) but now at RMIT's School of Property, Construction and Project Management.


Key findings

  • The location of a residential property under a Melbourne flight path has no significant long term impact on average house prices compared to non-affected residential suburbs
  • Houses in areas subject to aircraft noise have shown similar or higher average annual capital returns compared to non-affected properties with similar socio-economic status
  • Price and performance of property value is more closely linked to socio-economic status than aircraft noise impact
  • Decisions to purchase residential properties are based on a range of factors, including proximity to work, schools and services and the impact of aircraft noise is often offset by these considerations

Do you have a question relating to the Property Values study?

  • Read the Property Values study FAQs, or
  • Ask a question below

A property values study has been completed as part of Melbourne Airport's planning for its Runway Development Program.

The study looked at the impact of aircraft noise on property values in suburbs around Melbourne Airport and across the metropolitan area. It covered 320,000 residential property sales for 62 suburbs in 19 local government areas over a 25-year period from 1990 to 2015.

Many of the suburbs included in the study have been developed since Melbourne Airport opened in 1970. Some of the suburbs under flight paths have only been developed since 1998.

The study was undertaken by Property Economics Professor Chris Eves, formerly of the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) but now at RMIT's School of Property, Construction and Project Management.


Key findings

  • The location of a residential property under a Melbourne flight path has no significant long term impact on average house prices compared to non-affected residential suburbs
  • Houses in areas subject to aircraft noise have shown similar or higher average annual capital returns compared to non-affected properties with similar socio-economic status
  • Price and performance of property value is more closely linked to socio-economic status than aircraft noise impact
  • Decisions to purchase residential properties are based on a range of factors, including proximity to work, schools and services and the impact of aircraft noise is often offset by these considerations

Do you have a question relating to the Property Values study?

  • Read the Property Values study FAQs, or
  • Ask a question below

Ask us a question about the Property Values study and we will respond to you within three business days.


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